Chapter 3 Lab 1 SUBMIT.docx-Linux Operat...
Chapter_3_Lab_1_SUBMIT.docx-Linux Operating Systems – Chapter 3
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Chapter 3 Lab 1 SUBMIT.docx-Linux Operating System...
Chapter_3_Lab_1_SUBMIT.docx-Linux Operating Systems – Chapter 3
Chapter 3 Lab 1 SUBMIT.docx-Linux O...
Chapter_3_Lab_1_SUBMIT.docx-Linux Operating Systems – Chapter 3
Page 1
Linux Operating Systems – Chapter 3 Lab 1
This lab will give everyone a few examples of some different commands in Linux. We will explore some
of them in more detail later in the semester. Perform the following on your Fedora VM in class.
1)
First switch to a command line terminal by using Ctrl+Alt+F2
With Linux you can switch between what is known as terminals by using the ctrl-alt-
Function Key. One of these terminals, usually F3, will be your GUI. The other terminals will
be a CLI.
2)
Type the ‘date’ command. What is displayed on the screen?
The Computers set time
3)
Type ‘cd /home’ and then type ls.
What are the results? (just a description of what is being
displayed)
All that is returned is a dir with my name
4)
Type ‘cd’, which if entered with no options or arguments will take you to your home
directory
a.
Type pwd to verify your current directory location. Paste the path here:
/home/zach
b.
From your home directory type ls. Are the results different from the previous step?
Yes, instend of my surrent “Path” it is showing the subdirectories in zach
c.
Type ‘cd /’ and then type ‘ls’
There will be a number of directories listed. This is the
root level of the file system. We will discuss in more detail later in the semester.
What are 5 of the directories that are listed?
1
boot
etc
lib
lost+found
mnt
opt
root
sbin
sys
usr
bin
dev
home
lib64
media
null
proc
run
srv
tmp
var
5)
Type echo $PATH into your shell.
Copy/Paste the results here:
/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin
6)
Type echo PATH and echo $path.
What are the results? Why?
It just return the text because the $ was not there to symbolize it as a variable ant also the cmd
has to be in upper case not lower since it is case sensive.
7)
Create a new variable that contains your first and last name.
Hippo=”Zachary Hite”
8)
Use the echo command to display the contents of your new variable.
What did you have to type
for this to work?
echo $Hippo
9)
Type printenv to display all of the environmental variables on your system.
10) Use a combination of printenv and grep find out what the USERNAME variable is currently
set to. What command did you enter and what are the results? (note that commands are
case sensitive)
printenv | grep USERNAME
USERNAME=zach
11) Type clear. What does this command seem to do?


Page 2
IT seems to clear/reset the terminal of clutter.


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